A driver crossing the NSW/VIC border said they just wanted a Big Mac

REVEALED: The most ludicrous excuses Australians have given to try and sneak past coronavirus border restrictions

  • Drivers caught out using ridiculous excuses when trying to cross state borders
  • One driver said they had travelled from Melbourne to get a Big Mac in NSW
  • Another one said they were a ‘sovereign citizen’ and another wanted ‘fresh air’
  • One driver also tried to cross into Queensland with paper number plates on car 

The biggest covidiots have been exposed trying to dupe police and sneak across closed state borders with a number of bizarre excuses.

Drivers have tried to talk their way out of a fine by telling officers they wanted a breath of fresh air, groceries and even a Big Mac.

Others were more methodical and used fake paper number plates on their cars or claimed they were in the middle of a medical emergency.

One driver even said they were a ‘sovereign citizen’ and stood above the law. 

Daily Mail Australia has compiled a list of some of the most bizarre excuses drivers have given authorities for trying to cross the border.

The biggest covidiots have been exposed trying to dupe police (pictured, a checkpoint is set up at the Queensland and New South Wales border at Coolangatta on July 23)

The biggest covidiots have been exposed trying to dupe police (pictured, a checkpoint is set up at the Queensland and New South Wales border at Coolangatta on July 23)

Authorities monitor a checkpoint along the Queensland and New South Wales border (pictured on July 23)

Authorities monitor a checkpoint along the Queensland and New South Wales border (pictured on July 23)

New South Wales and Victoria border 

New South Wales closed its border with its neighbouring state in early July. 

Drivers who attempt to cross the barricade without a permit risk fines of up to $11,000 and six months imprisonment.

Though that hasn’t stopped a number of drivers from taking their chances. 

A 63-year-old man tried to leave Echuca and drive into Moama before he was caught.

The man allegedly refused to hand over his identification over claims he was a ‘sovereign citizen’ – which is someone who believes they are above the law.

Police escorted the man into the New South Wales town and took him straight to the local police station where they charged him.  

Another driver faced Albury court after he tried to enter Corowa.

The court heard he allegedly refused police help for a permit and claimed COVID-19 was fake and that the border closure was ‘unlawful’. 

A different driver was caught travelling from Melbourne to Wodonga. 

They told officers they had made the 320km journey because they wanted a Big Mac. 

Another person drove 115km from Melbourne to Ballarat because they wanted to get some ‘fresh air’. 

One driver drove from Werribee to the other side of Melbourne’s Springvale to allegedly do their grocery shopping. 

A man managed to make it as far as Sydney after he caught a flight from Melbourne.

He was found without a permit and allegedly told authorities he needed to make the trip to care for his children – he has none. 

A police officer patrols a border check along at a New South Wales and Queensland checkpoint

A police officer patrols a border check along at a New South Wales and Queensland checkpoint

A driver told officers they had made the 320km journey because they wanted a Big Mac (stock image)

A driver told officers they had made the 320km journey because they wanted a Big Mac (stock image)

New South Wales and Queensland border  

Queensland has kept its border closed with Victoria and is now turning back anyone from Greater Sydney as more COVID-19 hotspots crop up in the New South Wales capital.

Though since March, officers have thwarted a number of drivers and their attempts – some more creative than others – from trying to enter the state.

A driver was stopped at the border after authorities discovered paper licence plates were attached to his car.

They discovered a warrant had been issued for the man and a quick sweep of the vehicle uncovered stolen plates, green leaf materials and a glass pipe.

He was charged with two drug and property and one traffic offence. 

A New South Wales driver was found passed out in a car parked behind Broadbeach Police Station.

He allegedly could not tell Queensland police why he was in the state, other than to party and buy drugs.

Authorities handed him a COVID-19 penalty infringement notice.  

Another driver was turned away at the border in June though tried to get through another crossing in July while a New South Wales woman tried to enter the sunshine state twice by bus.

She was turned back, though not discouraged, and tried to enter twice more through another checkpoint before she received a COVID-19 penalty infringement notice.

Queensland has kept its border closed with Victoria and is now turning back anyone from Greater Sydney (pictured, cars crossing Queensland border on July 10)

Queensland has kept its border closed with Victoria and is now turning back anyone from Greater Sydney (pictured, cars crossing Queensland border on July 10)

Victoria and South Australia 

South Australia closed its border to Victoria in early July in a bid to avoid any risk of the COVID-19 outbreak crossing into the state. 

One Victorian man allegedly drove into the state because they were starting a new job while another driver allegedly sped through a checkpoint with blacked-out number plates.

A group said their friend needed urgent treatment for a possibly fractured ankle when they tried to drive their ute into the state.  

A mother-of-eight hid in the back of a truck and managed to make it as far as Mount Gambier before a tip-off led to her arrest.

She fronted court and was handed a suspended prison term. 

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