In late February, I traveled to Nebraska Medical Center for “Tucker Carlson Tonight” and met with several impressive physicians and nurses in charge of the National Quarantine Unit there.

They were taking care of the first COVID-19 cluster, more than a dozen passengers from the Diamond Princess cruise ship. They taught me about the severity of the illness and how highly contagious it is and I knew then that we were facing a formidable foe.

One of my final interviews was with a bearded researcher, an unassuming yet clearly brilliant scientist, Dr. Andre Kalil. He was a principal investigator into the National Institutes of Health-sponsored multicenter trial on an antiviral drug, Remdesivir, which had been studied against Ebola and found not to be effective.

DR. NICOLE SAPHIER: CORRECT CORONAVIRUS MISTAKES – AS FIRST WAVE CONTINUES, WE CAN LEARN FROM THESE LESSONS

But from a purely biochemical perspective, there was more reason to be optimistic for the drug as a potential treatment for COVID-19 than for Ebola. This coronavirus is composed of a single strand of genetic material known as ribonucleic acid. This RNA strand reproduces using an enzyme known as a polymerase. The polymerase incorporates four base pairs, one of which, adenine, looks very similar to Remdesivir.

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