Lawyer has sign slamming Queensland premier to be flown over Brisbane

‘She is heartless’: The extraordinary sign flying over Brisbane until the election – costing a lawyer furious at Annastacia Palaszczuk’s border stance $1,800 A WEEK

  • A Brisbane lawyer has taken aim at Queensland’s hardline border restrictions
  • James Stevens is paying for sign to be flown over Brisbane slamming the premier
  • Banner accuses Annastacia Palaszczuk of being ‘heartless’ for border closure
  • Another Brisbane man also paid for a sign calling for people to ‘vote her out’ 

A quarantined lawyer is so outraged at Queensland’s border stance he has vowed to spend $1,800 every week until the election to fly a sign over Brisbane calling the premier ‘heartless’. 

James Stevens is paying for a banner calling Annastacia Palaszczuk ‘heartless’ to be flown behind a plane from Coolangatta to Brisbane until the election on October 31. 

The message is in response to Queensland’s border restrictions which Mr Stevens said have ‘to stop’.  

He said seeing people being denied exemptions to attend funerals or visit dying relatives was ‘the most outrageous’ thing he had ever seen.

Brisbane lawyer James Stevens will spend $1,800 every week until the Queensland election to fly a banner (pictured) slamming premier Annastacia Palaszczuk as 'heartless' due to the state's border stance

Brisbane lawyer James Stevens will spend $1,800 every week until the Queensland election to fly a banner (pictured) slamming premier Annastacia Palaszczuk as ‘heartless’ due to the state’s border stance

‘I nearly threw my computer at the TV when I saw that,’ he told ABC News.

‘She (Annastacia Palaszczuk) has exhibited a real callousness, a cold-hearted attitude to people’s suffering and problems.’

Ms Palaszczuk has repeatedly stated that the Chief Health Officer, Jeannette Young, has the final say on border exemptions. 

Mr Stevens, who is in quarantine in Brisbane after returning from Sydney, isn’t the only person paying to send a message to the Queensland Government. 

Brisbane landscaper John McInerney used the same company to have a banner reading ‘vote her out’ flown from the Gold Coast to Brisbane. 

Both men said they don’t have any political affiliations and were standing up against what they saw as an injustice. 

Currently a person is given a health exemption to enter Queensland from a COVID-19 hotspot if the urgent medical care can’t be provided from a closer location. 

Mr Stevens and another Queensland man, John McInerney, have both paid for banners slamming the premier (pictured) in the lead up to the election saying she needs to be voted out

Mr Stevens and another Queensland man, John McInerney, have both paid for banners slamming the premier (pictured) in the lead up to the election saying she needs to be voted out

Anyone granted permission to enter Queensland from a COVID hotspot is required to go into 14-day quarantine in approved accommodation and at their own expense.

Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce described Queensland’s hardline border measures as a sham after American actor Tom Hanks was allowed to enter the state.

Hanks returned to Australia earlier this month to finish shooting a film, quarantining at a Gold Coast hotel with 11 other family, cast members and production staff.

Their entry was approved by the federal home affairs department at the request of the Queensland government.

Meanwhile no new COVID-19 cases were recorded in Queensland, while New South Wales recorded four new cases. 

‘It’s in stark contrast to people who can’t go to funerals, and that’s what aggravates me so much,’ Mr Joyce told the Seven Network.

‘We’ve got the AFL in there first class, we’ve got Tom Hanks in there, we’ve got his offsiders in there, but we can’t get a person across to see their dad buried.’

Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce described Queensland's hardline border measures as a sham after American actor Tom Hanks was allowed to enter the state (Queensland border checkpoint pictured)

Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce described Queensland’s hardline border measures as a sham after American actor Tom Hanks was allowed to enter the state (Queensland border checkpoint pictured)

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