Queen can’t travel to Balmoral with current restrictions

Even the Queen’s summer holiday is off! Monarch can’t travel to Balmoral because of restrictions on moving between England and Scotland – but may still go if the rules are changed

  • The Queen, 94, typically spends August and September in Balmoral, Scotland 
  • Currently the monarch is in isolation with Prince Philip, 99, at Windsor Castle 
  • Official advice discourages unnecessary travel between England and Scotland
  • Means the Queen might skip her summer holiday in favour of staying put 

The Queen could find her summer holiday cancelled due to the coronavirus crisis.

The monarch, 94, traditionally decamps to Balmoral, her sprawling estate in Aberdeenshire, at the end of July and stays there until the end of September. 

However current guidelines advising against non-essential travel between England and Scotland mean the Queen could be forced to skip the annual jaunt. 

The Queen is currently in isolation with the Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle and might not be able to travel to Balmoral, Aberdeenshire, for her summer holiday. Pictured, the Queen and Prince Philip at Windsor Castle in a photo to celebrated the Duke's 99th birthday this month

The Queen is currently in isolation with the Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle and might not be able to travel to Balmoral, Aberdeenshire, for her summer holiday. Pictured, the Queen and Prince Philip at Windsor Castle in a photo to celebrated the Duke’s 99th birthday this month

The Queen traditionally decamps to Balmoral, her sprawling estate in Aberdeenshire, at the end of July and stays there until the end of September. Pictured, Balmoral

The Queen traditionally decamps to Balmoral, her sprawling estate in Aberdeenshire, at the end of July and stays there until the end of September. Pictured, Balmoral

Her Majesty and the Duke of Edinburgh, 99, have been in joint isolation at Windsor Castle since the start of lockdown in March. If the couple were to travel, they would likely take a private helicopter in order to reduce risk. 

Buckingham Palace declined to comment on the Queen’s travel plans.  

Residents of Scotland and England have been encouraged not to travel between the two nations because there are different lockdown measures in each.  

While holiday accommodation has started to open up in England, allowing people to book staycations, they remain closed in Scotland. The earliest this is expected to change is July 15.  

Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall recently moved from Birkhall, on the Balmoral estate, to their London home of Clarence House as they lead the royal family in returning to public engagements after lockdown. 

Current guidelines advising against non-essential travel between England and Scotland mean the Queen could be forced to skip the annual jaunt. Pictured, the Queen in Balmoral last year

Current guidelines advising against non-essential travel between England and Scotland mean the Queen could be forced to skip the annual jaunt. Pictured, the Queen in Balmoral last year

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge remain at Anmer Hall, Norfolk, with their three children, Prince George, six, Princess Charlotte, five, and Prince Louis, two.  

Scotland continues to take a more cautious approach to lifting restrictions and remains in phase 2 of its plan, while England has progressed to stage 3. 

On Monday Nicola Sturgeon announced she would allow beer gardens and non-essential shops to re-open from next month – and three family groups to meet indoors.

The First Minister announced to the Scottish Parliament that she was following Boris Johnson’s example in England and relaxing restrictions introduced in March.

But the changes will come into effect more slowly than south of the border, where they will be introduced on July 4.

In Scotland, beer gardens can reopen on July 6, non-essential shops within indoor shopping centres from July 13.

And in a step that goes further than measures revealed by the Prime Minister yesterday, households will be able to meet indoors with people from up to two other households from July 15.  

The Queen marks what would have been the Ceremony of the Keys on Instagram 

The Queen marked the annual Ceremony of the Keys on Instagram yesterday after the event was cancelled due to COVID-19. 

The Royal Family shared photos of the Queen, 94, taking part in the ceremony in recent years, alongside a lengthy caption.  

The ceremony typically takes place in the forecourt of Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh and marks the start of a week-long stay in the city, known as Holyrood Week. 

The Queen marked the ancient Ceremony of the Keys on Instagram yesterday after the event was cancelled due to COVID-19. The Royal Family shared photos of the ceremony in recent years (one pictured), along with a lengthy caption explaining the tradition

The Queen marked the ancient Ceremony of the Keys on Instagram yesterday after the event was cancelled due to COVID-19. The Royal Family shared photos of the ceremony in recent years (one pictured), along with a lengthy caption explaining the tradition

As part of the Ceremony of the Keys, the Queen is welcomed into the city of Edinburgh, Her Majesty¿s 'ancient and hereditary kingdom of Scotland', by the Lord Provost, who offers her the keys of the city. Pictured, the Queen receiving the keys at a previous ceremony

As part of the Ceremony of the Keys, the Queen is welcomed into the city of Edinburgh, Her Majesty’s ‘ancient and hereditary kingdom of Scotland’, by the Lord Provost, who offers her the keys of the city. Pictured, the Queen receiving the keys at a previous ceremony

However this year the ceremony, and the subsequent visit, have been cancelled due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

As part of the Ceremony of the Keys, the Queen is welcomed into the city of Edinburgh, Her Majesty’s ‘ancient and hereditary kingdom of Scotland’, by the Lord Provost, who offers her the keys of the city.

The monarch then ceremoniously returns the keys, entrusting them to the elected officials of the city. 

She also inspects a guard of honour, provided by the Royal Regiment of Scotland.   

The Queen at the Ceremony of the Keys in Edinburgh in 2018, which she attended with the Duke of Edinburgh. The couple remain in isolation at Windsor Castle

The Queen at the Ceremony of the Keys in Edinburgh in 2018, which she attended with the Duke of Edinburgh. The couple remain in isolation at Windsor Castle 

Holyrood week celebrates Scottish culture, history and achievement.

There is an Investiture during the week, held in the Great Gallery at the Palace of Holyroodhouse, which is located at the end of the Royal Mile in the centre of Edinburgh. 

The Investiture recognises Scottish residents who have made a significant contribution to their society.  

A Garden Party is held, where The Queen welcomes around 8,000 people from all walks of Scottish life to spend a relaxed afternoon with her in the beautiful grounds of the Palace.

Apart from these regular engagements, The Queen also undertakes a number of regional Scottish engagements which vary from year to year. 

As part of the ceremony the Queen inspects a guard of honour, provided by the Royal Regiment of Scotland. Pictured, the Queen at a previous Ceremony of the Keys

As part of the ceremony the Queen inspects a guard of honour, provided by the Royal Regiment of Scotland. Pictured, the Queen at a previous Ceremony of the Keys

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